Google Home’s Philips Hue integration can now wake you up gently

Google Home’s Philips Hue integration can now wake you up gently

12:23pm, 17th April, 2019
Maybe you love the sound of your alarm clock blaring in the morning, heralding a new day full of joy and adventure. More likely, though, you don’t. If you prefer a more gentle wake-up (and have invested in some smart home technology), here’s some good news: Home lets you use your lights to wake you up by slowly changing the light in your room. first this integration at CES earlier this year, with a planned rollout in March. Looks like that took a little while longer, as Google and Philips gently brought this feature to life. Just like you can use your Home to turn on “Gentle Wake,” which starts changing your lights 30 minutes before your wake-up time to mimic a sunrise, you also can go the opposite way and have the lights mimic sunset as you get ready to go to bed. You can either trigger these light changes through an alarm or with a command that starts them immediately. While the price of white Hue bulbs has come down in recent years, colored hue lights remain rather pricey, with single bulbs going for around $40. If that doesn’t hold you back, though, the Gentle Sleep and Wake features are now available in the U.S., U.K., Canada, Australia, Singapore and India in English only.
Report: Indonesia’s Garuda airline seeks to cancel 737 MAX order in wake of crashes

Report: Indonesia’s Garuda airline seeks to cancel 737 MAX order in wake of crashes

1:24pm, 22nd March, 2019
An artist’s conception shows a Garuda Airlines 737 MAX jet in flight. (Boeing Illustration) Indonesia’s national airline, , is saying it wants to cancel an order for 49 Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets, citing the effect of two catastrophic crashes on passenger confidence. The order, , has a list-price value of roughly $6 billion. Only one of the 50 MAX jets ordered back then has been delivered to date. In interviews with media outlets including , , , , and , Garuda officials cited consumers’ low confidence in the 737 MAX in the wake of crashes that killed , and . “Many passengers told us they were afraid to get on a MAX 8,” Reuters quoted Garuda CEO Aria Askhara as saying. Garuda’s request hints at the economic impact that the crashes could have going forward. Boeing’s 737 MAX jets have been grounded worldwide as the crash investigations continue. Preliminary data suggest that an automatic flight control system known as the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System or MCAS played a role in both crashes. Boeing added the MCAS to the 737 MAX line as a safeguard against stalls, but spurious data from a single sensor that monitors air flow may have forced each plane into a dive. Reports relating to cockpit conversations suggest that the pilots on both flights , but apparently didn’t follow a specified procedure for turning off the MCAS system. One of the controversies surrounding the 737 MAX focuses on whether pilots were adequately trained about the MCAS and what to do if it malfunctioned. Another controversy has to do with indicators that Boeing can install on the plane to tell pilots that the suspect sensor system is providing mismatched data. The New York Times reported that the indicators. Boeing says it’s preparing to release a software upgrade aimed at addressing concerns about the MCAS system and the angle-of-attack sensors, and will change its pilot training program for the 737 MAX as well. The Transportation Department says it will for flight, and the FBI and Justice Department are . As of the end of February, Boeing , with 376 of those planes delivered. Deliveries have now been along with 737 MAX flights. Boeing says the 737 assembly lines at its plant in Renton, Wash., will be to “focus on completing work that was previously delayed.” Garuda’s request could be seen as the first publicly confirmed request for an order cancellation to be sparked by the crash controversies. However, analysts told Reuters that even before this month’s Ethiopian Airlines crash, Garuda was considering a shift in its airplane procurement plan. “We don’t want to use MAX jets … but maybe will consider switching it with another Boeing model of plane,” Garuda spokesman Ikhsan Rosan told AP. Boeing has declined to comment on Garuda’s cancellation request, but the airline says Boeing representatives are due to visit Jakarta next week for further discussions.
Canada grounds Boeing 737 MAX jets in wake of Ethiopia crash, isolating U.S.

Canada grounds Boeing 737 MAX jets in wake of Ethiopia crash, isolating U.S.

1:18pm, 13th March, 2019
Air Canada joins the list of carriers grounding their 737 MAX planes. (Air Canada Photo) Canada today joined scores of nations in suspending flights of Boeing 737 MAX jets, out of concern that two catastrophic 737 crashes might be related. The move by Transport Minister Marc Garneau leaves the United States and the Federal Aviation Administration increasingly isolated in its stance that the 737 MAX 8 and MAX 9 jets are airworthy and that no further safety measures are needed at this time. Boeing 737-8 and 737-9 planes are barred from arrivals and departures in Canada, and will not be allowed to fly over the country until further notice, Garneau said. Air Canada operates 24 of the 737-8 jets, while WestJet has 13 of the planes and Sunwing has four. Air Canada said that it was but that there may be delays. Garneau said satellite data suggested there were similarities between the flight profiles for the 737-8 involved in an Ethiopian Airlines crash that killed 157 people on Sunday and a , killing 189 people. In both cases, the pilots reported control difficulties just after takeoff, and the planes nose-dived shortly afterward. Garneau said the satellite readings were not conclusive, and he shied away from saying definitively that the crashes were related. “But it is something that points possibly in that direction, and at this point we feel that that threshold has been crossed and that is why we are taking these measures,” he said. With Canada having blocked Boeing 737 Max planes from its airspace, the US has the only remaining ones, with nearly 50 currently in use. — Jillian Stampher (@JillianStampher) Preliminary findings from the Lion Air investigation focused on an automatic flight control system known as the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System or MCAS. The system is designed to keep the 737 MAX from stalling under extreme aerodynamic conditions, but investigators said spurious sensor data may have caused the MCAS to put the Lion Air plane into an unwarranted dive. Boeing has laid out a procedure that pilots can use in such a scenario to switch off the MCAS system, but that procedure wasn’t followed by the Lion Air pilots. The FAA says Boeing is due to upgrade the MCAS software next month. Concerns about a potential link between the two fatal crashes have led to widespread groundings of the 737 MAX, the latest incarnation of Boeing’s best-selling plane. China and the European Union have been joined by nations ranging from Mexico to Oman. On Tuesday, the FAA issued a statement saying that it saw “no basis to order grounding” 737 MAX airplanes, and that no other civil aviation authorities have furnished data that would warrant further action: UPDATED Statement regarding 737 MAX. — The FAA (@FAANews) Boeing said it had no new guidance to offer to 737 MAX operators. “We understand that regulatory agencies and customers have made decisions that they believe are most appropriate for their home markets,” the company said in a statement Tuesday. “We’ll continue to engage with them to ensure they have the information needed to have confidence in operating their fleets.” The black-box recorders from Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 have been recovered, but there’s no word yet about what was found in the cockpit recordings or flight data.